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Endeavour Catchment Story

The catchment stories present a story using real maps that can be interrogated, zoomed in and moved to explore the area in more detail. They are used to take users through multiple maps, images and videos to provide engaging, in-depth information.

Quick facts

This map journal
is part of a series of catchment stories prepared for Queensland.
 

Download catchment boundary KML

Transcript

This catchment story is part of a series prepared for the catchments of Queensland.

We would like to respectfully acknowledge the Traditional Owners of the land on which this project takes place, and Elders both past and present. We also recognise those whose ongoing effort to protect and promote Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander cultures will leave a lasting legacy for future Elders and leaders.

Table of contents

  1. Understanding how water flows in the catchment
  2. How to view this map journal
  3. Map journal for the Endeavour catchment—water movement
  4. Endeavour catchment story
  5. Values of the catchment—key features
  6. Values of the catchment—economic
  7. Values of the catchment—environmental and social
  8. Values of the catchment—traditional owners
  9. Natural features—geology and topography
  10. Natural features—rainfall
  11. Natural features—vegetation
  12. Modified features—infrastructure, dams, weirs and bores
  13. Modified features—sediment
  14. Water quality
  15. Water flow
  16. The main areas
  17. Endeavour River
  18. Carol Creek
  19. Scrubby Creek & Trevethan Creek
  20. Wallaby Creek
  21. Upper Annan Creek
  22. Oaky Creek
  23. Lower Annan Creek
  24. Gap Creek
  25. Conclusion
  26. Acknowledgments
  27. Data source, links and extra information

Main image. The Endeavour River mouth from Grassy Hill - provided by the Andrew Meiklejohn.

Understanding how water flows in the catchment

To effectively manage a catchment it is important to have a collective understanding of how the catchment works. This map journal gathers information from experts, local land managers and other data sources to provide that understanding.

The information was gathered using the ‘walking the landscape’* process, where experts and local land managers systematically worked through a catchment in a facilitated workshop, to incorporate diverse knowledge on the landscape features and processes, both natural and human. It focused on water flow and the key factors that affect water movement.

The map journal was prepared by the Queensland Wetlands Program in the Queensland Department of Environment and Science in collaboration with local partners.

*Walking the Landscape—A Whole-of-system Framework for Understanding and Mapping Environmental Processes and Values (Department of Environment and Heritage Protection 2012) - see links at the end of this map journal for further information.

How to view this map journal

This map journal is best viewed in Chrome or Firefox, not Explorer.

Main image. Keatings Lagoon, near Cooktown - provided by Department of Environment and Science.

Map journal for the Endeavour catchment—water movement

This map journal describes the location, extent and values of the Endeavour catchment. It demonstrates the key features which influence water flow, including geology, topography, rainfall and runoff, natural features, human modifications and land uses.

Knowing how water moves in the landscape is fundamental to sustainably managing the catchment and the services it provides.

Main image. Looking out over the Endeavour Catchment - provided by the Andrew Meiklejohn.

Endeavour catchment story

The Endeavour catchment is located in north Queensland and is part of the Cape York Natural Resource Management (NRM) region, with a small portion in the Wet Tropics NRM Region. The catchment falls mostly within the Cook Shire and Hope Vale Aboriginal Shire council areas.

The catchment includes large areas of Aboriginal freehold land.* Land use is dominated by conservation and natural environments (national park and traditional indigenous uses) and farming, together with other land uses. The tenure of Aboriginal freehold land is held by several different groups and it is important to approach the relevant group prior to access.

The catchment covers approximately 2,182 square kilometres (click for animation).

The main waterways are the Endeavour (Right Arm and North Branch and South Branch of the Left Arm) and Annan rivers, together with many other waterways including:

  • Isabella, Mango Tree, Surrender and Three Mile creeks which flow into the Endeavour River,
  • Scrubby, Wallaby and Trevethan creeks which flow into the upper Annan River,
  • Lyon and Middle Oaky creeks which flow into the Annan River via Oaky Creek,
  • Hardwicke, Esk, Meldrum and Saltwater (Keatings Lagoon) creeks which flow into the lower Annan River, and
  • Gap Creek which flows directly to the Great Barrier Reef (GBR) lagoon.

All waterways (click for animation) flow to the GBR lagoon, and the Coral Sea. The GBR is World Heritage-listed (GBR WHA) and a marine park** (GBRMP).

The Endeavour Catchment is adjacent to the Normamby, Jeannie and Daintree 'sub-basins' (or catchments)***. There are hydrological connections between these coastal catchments through surface flow and groundwater.

There is a drop-down legend for most maps and it can be accessed by clicking on 'LEGEND' at the top right of the map. On this map you can use the drop down legend for the land use.

There are also 'pop-ups' for most mapping features - simply click on the mapping of interest for more information.

Main image. The Endeavour River, Cooktown - provided by Andrew Meiklejohn.

*Land tenure map correct at time of publishing (version 35 dated 8 August 2018) - provided by Department of Environment and Science.

**'Zoning is an important component in managing marine areas. It defines the activities that can occur in which locations. The level of protection increases from the General Use (Light Blue) Zones up to the most restrictive, Preservation Zone. Each zone has different rules for the activities that are allowed, the activities that are prohibited and the activities that require a permit. Zones may also place restrictions on how some activities are conducted.

There are eight different types of zones that apply to the entire Great Barrier Reef Marine Park. The major zones are:

  • General Use (Light Blue)
  • Habitat Protection (Dark Blue)
  • Conservation Park (Yellow)
  • Marine National Park (Green).

Other zones include Preservation (Pink), Scientific Research (Orange), Buffer (Olive Green) and Commonwealth Island Zones, which make up less than five per cent of the Marine Park.' (Great Barrier Reef Marine Park Authority 2020). See links at the end of this map journal for further information.

***This mapping shows the DNRME 'sub-basin' mapping. The use of the terms 'catchment', 'basin' and 'sub-basin' are sometimes used interchangeably. In this map journal the term 'catchment' has been used other than when referring to this DNRME mapping.

Values of the catchment—key features

Key features of the Endeavour catchment include:

  • Two separate large river systems, the Endeavour River and the Annan River, with river mouths less than 20 kilometres apart and a metamorphic ridge separating the two systems.
  • The Annan and Endeavour rivers define the basin of Cooktown with the area formed as part of three separate volcanoes erupting.
  • Average annual rainfall is highest in the south-east, however there have been period of extreme wet and extreme dry since records began approximately 150 years ago.
  • High elevations of sandstone and metamorphic geology with some basalt, granite and metamorphics.
  • Fast runoff from the high elevation sedimentary and granite geologies.
  • High elevation sandstones allow water to infiltrate to supply base flow to Isabella Creek.
  • High rainfall and runoff from granite support near-permanent flow in the Annan River.
  • A weir on the Annan River has created a permanent waterhole, which is the drinking water supply to Cooktown.
  • Basalt areas support farming due to fertile soils and associated aquifer/groundwater (Hope Vale).
  • Basalt at the confluence of the Endeavour River south and north branches creates natural weirs and waterholes.
  • Lower elevations are dominated by alluvium over metamorphic rock, which is very erosive/friable in some areas (e.g. Scrubby and Oaky creeks).
  • Rainfall varies from high volumes in the south-east to lower volumes in the flatter parts.
  • Fault lines intersect Wallace and Oaky creeks.
  • Water movement is fast at elevation (including waterfalls at Isabella Creek and the Annan River headwaters) and slower in the lower lying parts.
  • Most of the wetlands are coastal and north of Cooktown, and sit in alluvium and sand over metamorphics, and the estuarine reaches of the Annan and Endeavour rivers.
  • There are large estuaries in the lower Annan and lower Endeavour rivers.
  • Some parts have been cleared to support grazing, and other land uses such as cropping, and rural and peri-urban settlements (Rossville, Hope Vale, Cooktown).
  • Large areas of Aboriginal freehold land.
  • The area is important to Traditional Owners.
  • There has been historic mining, and there are many abandoned mines (e.g. Trevethan Creek and the Annan River) and some current mining and quarrying.
  • Several high value areas with endemic species and other important flora and fauna such as mangroves and saltmarshes, Cooktown gecko, magpie geese, sacred ibis, estuarine crocodiles, shorebirds, commercial and recreational fisheries species, dugong and platypus.
  • Feral pigs, horses, and cattle are known to cause erosion issues in some areas.
  • Tilapia recorded in the Endeavour River, and weeds (e.g. sicklepod, hymenachne, gamba grass) occur throughout catchment with varying densities and distribution.
  • National Parks include Ngalba Bulal, Annan River, Endeavour River, Black Mountain, Mount Cook and Cedar Bay.

Main image. Water lilies in Keatings Lagoon - provided by Department of Environment and Science.

**Areas mapped as ’contains wetlands’ typically include many small wetlands, which are too small to map individually.

Values of the catchment—economic

The Endeavour catchment supports a variety of land uses*, mostly conservation and natural areas with traditional indigenous uses and grazing (mostly on native pastures).

There are smaller areas of forestry, other farming (cropping, irrigated cropping, horticulture) and residential (Urban area of Cooktown and rural settlements including farming infrastructure), together with other minor land uses.

Main image. Highway crossing of the Annan River - provided by Andrew Meiklejohn.

*Australian Land Use Management Classification (Department of Agriculture and Water Resources 2010) - see links at the end of this map journal for further information.

Values of the catchment—environmental and social

The Endeavour catchment provides important habitat for many marine, estuarine, freshwater and terrestrial species. The catchment holds important values for Traditional Owners and there are large areas of Aboriginal freehold land.

The catchment includes large protected areas and indigenous lands, which also provide for recreational activities such as bush walking and bird watching. These activities not only provide substantial social and health benefits but they are also very important for tourism.

The wetlands and creeks of the catchment provide habitat for many important aquatic species, including plants, fish and birds. Pandanus swamps grow throughout the catchment and can indicate groundwater close to the surface.

Estuarine areas also support important plants (mangrove, saltmarsh and seagrass), estuarine crocodiles, marine turtles, marine mammals and fisheries species. These areas are also used for camping, fishing, crabbing and boating.

Information about the different types of wetlands shown in this mapping is provided here.

The catchment also includes part of both the Wet Tropics of Queensland WHA and a declared Fish Habitat Area (FHA)**. Many of the species in the catchment have lifecycles with connections to the GBR, which is a marine park and also World Heritage-listed.

Main image. Black Mountain - provided by Department of Environment and Science.

*Queensland Wetland Mapping version 5 (2017).

**Declared Fish Habitat Area Plans (Queensland Government 2019) - see links at the end of this map journal for further information.

Natural features—geology and topography

Several different rock types combine to make up the geology of the Endeavour catchment.

The headwaters of the catchment are dominated by metamorphic geologies (mudrock/arenite, mostly the Hodgkinson Formation) and sandstones (Gilbert River Formation and Dalrymple Sandstone) on high elevations. There are some granites (Kennedy Province) in the upper areas of the Annan River basin. Water flow is fast off these hard geologies, particularly where slopes are steep.

There are areas of more porous geologies, which allow for groundwater infiltration, including small areas of basalt, large areas of sand in the north-east, and alluvium and colluvium on the lower elevations.

Conceptual models for several of the catchment's geology types are provided below.

Exclusion zones - conceptual diagram by Queensland Government.

Fractured rocks - conceptual diagram by Queensland Government.

Alluvia - conceptual diagram by Queensland Government.

Alluvia - lower catchment - conceptual diagram by Queensland Government.

Beach ridges - conceptual model provided by Queensland Government.

Beach ridges - conceptual model provided by Queensland Government.

Main Image. The Endeavour River - provided by the Department of Environment and Science.

Natural features—rainfall

The Endeavour catchment usually experiences annual wet and dry seasons, with most of the rainfall typically between January and March*.

The hydrological seasonality associated with these wet and dry season flow conditions are critical to the ecological character, function and associated values of aquatic ecosystems. The permanent and semi-permanent waterholes provide critical refugia during the dry season.

Average annual rainfall** is highest in the south-east and lowest in the north-west.

*Climate online data (Bureau of Meteorology 2019) - see links at the end of this map journal for further information.

**This dataset depicts the 50-year mean annual rainfall isoheyts (contours) over Queensland for the period 1920 to 1969. The dataset was produced from the mean annual rainfall of as many locations as possible including private collections. Incomplete datasets were 'made whole' by calculating values for missing periods through correlation with adjacent rainfall stations.

Natural features—vegetation

Vegetation affects how water flows through the catchment, and this process is affected by land use and management practices. Native vegetation slows water, retaining it longer in the landscape and recharging groundwater aquifers, and reducing the erosion potential and the loss of soil from the catchment.

Vegetation impacts on water flow - conceptual diagram by Queensland Government.

Several different vegetation types combine to make up the original native (preclearing) vegetation of the Endeavour Catchment.* Small parts of the catchment, mostly in the lower parts, have been cleared or partially-cleared for a range of rural land uses.

Explore the swipe map showing vegetation clearing over time, using either of the options below.***

Interactive swipe app where you can zoom into areas and use the swipe bar (ESRI version)

Interactive swipe app where you can use the swipe bar. Use the white slide bar at the bottom of the map for a comparison (HTML version)

These developments and activities change the shape of the landscape and can modify water flow patterns.

Main image. Vegetation at Keatings Lagoon - provided by the Department of Environment and Science.

*Broad Vegetation Groups derived from Regional Ecosystems. Regional Ecosystems are vegetation communities in a bioregion that are consistently associated with a particular combination of geology, landform and soil.

**Smaller areas of regrowth are not shown in this mapping. This dataset was prepared to support certain category C additions to the Regulated Vegetation Management Map under the Vegetation Management (Reinstatement) and Other Legislation Amendment Bill 2016. This dataset is described as: The 2013 areas of non-remnant native woody vegetation that have not been cleared between 1988 and 2014 that are homogenous for at least 0.5 hectare and occur in clumps of at least 2 hectares in coastal regions and 5 hectares elsewhere.

***This application takes time to load.

Modified features—infrastructure, dams, weirs and bores

There is limited infrastructure across the catchment. Land use has modified natural hydrology in some areas. Modifications to channels, such as straightening and diversions, can increase flow rates.

Important infrastructure such as roads, tracks and creek crossings can create barriers and impermeable surfaces that redirect water through single points or culverts, leading to channeling of water in some parts of the catchment.

Many of the roads in this catchment are unsealed, which can have various impacts. Erosion from these unsealed roads can lead to increased sedimentation in adjacent waterways. This can reduce habitat quality and availability for aquatic life such as macrophytes, invertebrates (e.g. mussels) and fish.

Unsealed roads can also become boggy and impassable during wet periods. This can lead users to drive off-track and/or create additional roads and tracks, further impacting vegetation and water quality.

Roads and levees - conceptual diagram by Queensland Government.

Dams and weirs also modify natural water flow patterns. They can hold water that would otherwise flow straight into the stream network, and influence tidal movement.

Dams, weirs and infrastructure can also affect fish passage through the catchment.

There are also many bores* across the catchment, which can influence groundwater systems. The bore fields around Cooktown are particularly important as they provide the back-up town water supply.

*Taken from database storing registered water bore data from private water bores and Queensland Government groundwater investigation and monitoring bores (active and inactive) - provided by online Queensland Spatial Catalogue, see metadata at the end of this map journal for further information.

Modified features—sediment

Much of the catchment is undeveloped and protected by native vegetation.

Vegetation clearing and roads can result in increases in the volume and speed of runoff. Cattle, feral pigs and horses can disturb the soil, increasing erosion in the landscape and the stream channels. This can result in sediment being carried downstream impacting water quality.

Coastal erosion can also be associated with wave action, particularly cyclones.

The suspended sediment of most risk to the GBR is the fine fraction. Fine sediment:

  • contains most of the nitrogen and phosphorus content (and other potential contaminants such as metals),
  • travels widely in flood plumes rather than all depositing near the river mouth, and
  • substantially reduces light when in suspension.

The impacts of suspended sediment also contributes to the cumulative impacts of other stressors (e.g. freshwater flood plumes, elevated nutrients, impacts from cyclones, increasing sea surface temperatures) to increase the overall impact on organisms of the GBR.

While coarse sediment may not travel as far as fine sediment, posing a smaller risk to the GBR, it can still impact local values. Coarse sediment tends to settle out of the water column more rapidly and can smother local benthic communities (e.g. freshwater mussel beds).

Some waterways (e.g. Oaky Creek) are currently being infilled by coarse sediment due to the erosive nature of soils in the upper catchment. This can increase sediment in the channel and smother fauna such as freshwater mussels and other filter feeding infauna.

Main image. Finch Bay looking north - provided by Andrew Meiklejohn.

Water quality

Water quality is influenced by diffuse runoff and point source inputs. Most of the catchment is protected by vegetation, however runoff can be generated by farming, residential and other land uses.

Diffuse runoff includes on-site sewage facilities (e.g. septic tanks) and stormwater discharges, particularly from low permeability surfaces. The concentration of potential contaminants in the stormwater discharge depends on the land use of the area.

A wastewater treatment plant (WTP) near Cooktown discharges into the Endeavour estuary, and a WTP near Hope Vale discharges into the Endeavour River Right Arm.

A major consideration of this catchment is the proximity to sensitive receiving environments. Coral reefs, mussel beds and seagrass beds of high conservation significance occur adjacent to this catchment. There is very little opportunity for the landscape features to capture or treat potential contaminants before they are delivered to the fringing reefs and associated ecosystems.

Main image. Waterhole above Isabella Falls - provided by Department of Environment and Science.

See links at the end of this map journal for further information on the following references.

*Reef 2050 Water Quality Improvement Plan (Queensland Government 2018)

**Related literature:

Great Barrier Reef Catchment Loads Modelling Program (Queensland Government 2017)

Reef 2050 Water Quality Improvement Plan 2017-2022 (Queensland Government 2018)

Reef 2050 Water Quality Improvement Plan - Report cards (Queensland Government 2017)

Water flow

Water flows across the landscape into the Endeavour River and other waterways (click for animation)*.

Rainfall results in runoff to lakes, streams and rivers and infiltration to groundwater. Groundwater may also contribute to stream flow depending on geology and time of year and/or support a variety of groundwater dependent ecosystems. Runoff may also support a variety of terrestrial ecosystems or be used for other purposes.

The smaller channels and gullies eventually flatten out to form larger waterways that flow through lower lying land. They pass through unconsolidated sediments that store and release water, prolonging the time streams flow.

Gauging stations operate in the Endeavour catchment and links to historic flow information** can be found at the end of this map journal.

*Please note this application takes time to load.

**Water Monitoring Information Portal (Queensland Government 2020) - see links at the end of this map journal for further information.

The main areas

A 'catchment' is an area with a natural boundary (for example ridges, hills or mountains) where all surface water drains to a common channel to form rivers or creeks.*

The Endeavour catchment is listed as a single catchment but consists of several distinct areas which have similar characteristics:

  • Endeavour River (including the Right Arm, and the North Branch and South Branch of the Left Arm)
  • Carol Creek
  • Scrubby and Trevethan creeks
  • Wallaby Creek
  • Oaky Creek (including Wallace, Middle Oaky and Lyon creeks)
  • Upper Annan River
  • Lower Annan River (including Hardwicke, Esk, Meldrum and Saltwater creeks and Keatings Lagoon)
  • Gap Creek

Main image. Grassy Hill - provided by Andrew Meiklejohn.

*Definition sourced from the City of Gold Coast website - see links at the end of this map journal.

Endeavour River

  • The headwaters of the Endeavour River are in sandstones and metamorphics, and receive relatively high rainfall at elevation.
  • The lower parts are dominated by alluvium over basalt or metamorphics.
  • Sandstones provide for flow in Isabella Creek (see Isabella Falls).
  • Some basalt aquifers provide small volumes of water.
  • The Hope Vale area includes farming on the basalt (fruit crops) and residential development.
  • A wastewater treatment plant (WTP) near Cooktown discharges into the Endeavour estuary, and a WTP near Hope Vale discharges into the Endeavour River Right Arm.
  • Stormwater drains redirect flows into the estuary.
  • Water is extracted from Carol Creek to supply Hope Vale plantations.
  • Sandstone ridge along coastline retains water in landscape and confines Endeavour River Right Arm from the east, and there are wetlands on the alluvium over metamorphics.
  • This area supports a large dugong nursery.

Main image. Isabella Falls - provided by Department of Environment and Science.

Carol Creek

  • Carol Creek and tributaries are largely confined by hard geologies.
  • The headwaters are dominated by sandstone at high elevation, with the mid parts dominated by hard metamorphics and granite, and the lower elevations dominated by more porous geologies such as alluvium and basalt.
  • There is permanent flow from the sandstone aquifers.
  • Carol Creek provides large volumes of water to the the Endeavour River Right Arm.
  • Water is extracted and redirected from this system to other parts of the catchment (including Hope Vale).

Scrubby and Trevethan creeks

  • Scrubby Creek and tributaries are confined by hard geology with high runoff and fast flow from the steep headwaters.
  • There are highly erosive alluvial soils in the lower parts with gully and river bank erosion.
  • Trevethan Creek headwaters are in granite and sedimentary geologies at very high elevations (highest in the catchment) and receive very high rainfall with fast flow and waterfalls.
  • There are large volumes of runoff following rainfall in this part of the catchment.
  • There are abandoned mines, with hydraulic sluicing (the process of moving materials by water) used for mineral extraction.

Wallaby Creek

  • Wallaby Creek flows from the high elevation through the township of Rossville.
  • Wallaby Creek receives water from many tributaries including Jones and Buyers creeks, which converge near Rossville.
  • The headwaters received very high rainfall (including good winter rain), with fast flow and waterfalls.
  • It is a near-permanent to permanent system, which supplies water for Rossville.
  • These waterways are close to the northern extent of the platypus population in Queensland.

Upper Annan River

  • The Annan River lies to the south of the Endeavour River with headwaters in hard metamorphics.
  • There are fast flows through mostly non-permanent systems (e.g. waterholes), and channels can transmit large volumes of water during the wet season.
  • The channels are capable of transmitting large volumes of water during the wet season.
  • A weir in the upper reaches has created a permanent waterhole, which is the drinking water supply to Cooktown.

Main image. The Annan River upstream of Muligan Highway - provided by Department of Environment and Science.

Oaky Creek

  • Oaky Creek flows to the mid reaches of the Annan River.
  • Oaky Creek is considered to be a major erosion hotspot and a major source of sediment to the Annan River.
  • There are permanent waterholes with good connectivity to the marine environment, and sediment levels are increasing in these waterholes due to upstream erosion.
  • There is a fault line running north-south along Wallace Creek, with water flow along the fault line before running into Oaky Creek.
  • This area is typically country is scrubby and dry with sparse vegetation.

Lower Annan River

  • The lower Annan River is tidal with dense mangrove forests and saltmarsh.
  • Meldrum and Saltwater creeks flows through Keatings Lagoon, with the tidal interface at the road crossing.

Main image. Keatings Lagoon - provided by Department of Environment and Science.

Gap Creek

  • Gap Creek is a near-permanent, spring-fed system that flows directly to the GBR lagoon.
  • There are ponded pastures (hymenachne) at the tidal interface.
  • A program of works is underway to protect wetlands from the impact of cattle and feral animals.
  • There is very good connectivity between the marine and fresh waters, with diadromous species* such as jungle perch in the system.
  • There is a waterhole popular for swimming in the upper parts.

*Diadromous fish species move between fresh and salt water to complete their lifecycle (e.g. jungle perch, barramundi, Australian bass and sea mullet).

Conclusion

The Endeavour catchment shows how natural and modified features within the landscape impact water flow. These issues need to be managed to ensure that the significant natural (and social) values of the catchment are protected, and to minimise impacts on the multitude of values within the catchment and downstream in the GBR, while providing for residential, water supply, farming and other important land uses of the catchment.

Knowing how the catchment functions is also important for future planning, including climate resilience. With this knowledge, we can make better decisions about how we manage this vital area.

Main image. The Endeavour Catchment - provided by the Department of Environment and Science.

Acknowledgments

Developed by the Queensland Wetlands Program in the Department of Environment and Science in partnership with the Cape York Natural Resource Management and other local partners:

Thank you to those that have contributed:

  • Cape York Land Council
  • Christina Howley
  • Hope Vale Aboriginal Shire Council
  • Hope Vale Congress Aboriginal Corporation RNTBC
  • Hope Vale Community
  • Jabalbina Aboriginal Corporation
  • Valley View
  • Jabilbina Aboriginal Corporation
  • Wujal Wujal Aboriginal Shire Council
  • Pickersgill
  • Isabella Creek

This resource should be cited as: Walking the Landscape – Endeavour Catchment Story v1.0 (2020), presentation, Department of Environment and Science, Queensland.

Images provided by:

  • Andrew Meikljohn
  • Department of Environment and Science

The Queensland Wetlands Program

The Queensland Wetlands Program supports projects and activities that result in long-term benefits to the sustainable management, wise use and protection of wetlands in Queensland. The tools developed by the Program help wetlands landholders, managers and decision makers in government and industry.

Contact wetlands♲des.qld.gov.au or visit https://wetlandinfo.des.qld.gov.au

Disclaimer

This map journal has been prepared with all due diligence and care, based on the best available information at the time of publication. The department holds no responsibility for any errors or omissions within the document. Any decisions made by other parties based on this document are solely the responsibility of those parties. Information contained in this document is from a number of sources and, as such, does not necessarily represent government or departmental policy.

Data source, links and extra information

Software Used

ArcGIS for Desktop | ArcGIS Online | Story Map JournalStory Map Series |

Some of the information used to put together this Map Journal can be viewed on the QLD Globe.

Queensland Globe allows you to view and explore Queensland spatial data and imagery. You can also download a cadastral SmartMap or purchase and download a current titles search.

More information about the layers used can be found here:

Source Data Table

Flooding Information

Cook Shire Council

Other References

City of Gold Coast (2018) Protecting Catchments [webpage] Accessed 18 September 2020

Department of Agriculture, Water and the Environment (2010) Australian Land Use Management Classification[webpage] Accessed 18 September 2020

Department of Environment and Heritage Protection (2012) Walking the Landscape—A Whole-of-system Framework for Understanding and Mapping Environmental Processes and Values, Queensland Wetlands Program, Queensland Government, Brisbane

Great Barrier Reef Marine Park Authority (2020) What zoning is [webpage] 18 September 2020

Queensland Government (2019) Declared Fish Habitat Area Plans [webpage] Accessed 18 September 2020

Queensland Government (2016) Water Regulation 2016, Current as at 1 July 2018 [webpage] Accessed 18 September 2020

Queensland Government (2018) Great Barrier Reef Catchment Loads Modelling Program [webpage] Accessed 18 September 2020

Queensland Government (2018) Reef 2050 Water Quality Improvement Plan 2017-2022, State of Queensland, Brisbane

Queensland Government (2018) Reef 2050 Water Quality Improvement Plan - Report Cards [webpage] Accessed 18 September 2020

Queensland Government (2020) Water Monitoring Information Portal [webpage] Accessed 18 September 2020


Last updated: 15 September 2020

This page should be cited as:

Department of Environment and Science, Queensland (2020) Endeavour Catchment Story, WetlandInfo website, accessed 24 September 2020. Available at: https://wetlandinfo.des.qld.gov.au/wetlands/ecology/processes-systems/water/catchment-stories/transcript-endeavour.html

Queensland Government
WetlandInfo   —   Department of Environment and Science