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Rural and agricultural areas

Illegal dumping of other agricultural products, equipment and household wastes on roadsides or other areas off-property Unsecured items being blown or washed off the property Unsecured items (including equipment, fencing matterials, chemicals, furniture) moving off the property due to wind, storms and other events Unsecured items (including equipment, fencing matterials, chemicals, furniture) moving off the property due to wind, storms and other events Dumping materials that could present biohazard risks Dumping agricultural and household waste on roadsides or other areas off-property Animal effluent leaking from trucks

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There are a diverse range of land types and activities that fit into the rural and agricultural areas category. These include but are not limited to horticulture, animal production, residential (urban and rural) and small-scale farms, stock routes, sale and stock yards, some abandoned lands and natural areas. Like all other sectors, agricultural practitioners are, in general, known to follow best practice and programs such as AgSafe are used to collect containers and used chemicals. Despite this, the following waste pollution can still occur from unscrupulous operators.

Waste pollution that may result from these areas include:

  • discarded materials that could present biosecurity risks, such as animal carcasses, pesticides and herbicides
  • discarded agricultural, farm and household waste on roadsides or other areas off-property, such as tyres, fencing, equipment, electronics and whitegoods
  • unsecured items being blown or washed off the property during severe weather events
  • animal effluent leaking from trucks
  • illegal activities transporting waste into the area from external sources.

Agriculture provides a vital contribution to Queensland’s economic growth and social wellbeing. Like all other sectors, however, it can be a source of waste pollution.

The use of plastics in agricultural practices can greatly enhance production systems and result in improved environmental outcomes. For example, the use of drip tape irrigation is highly water efficient and can help reduce the movement of nutrients and pesticides off paddocks and into waterways.

Other plastic products used in agriculture include soil fumigation film, irrigation tubing, nursery pots and silage bags, plant/soil coverings, row coverings, and high and low tunnels.

Although these products are often encouraged in best practice management systems, research has shown that when exposed to ultraviolet (UV) rays, many of these plastics break up and can leach into the soil or be carried away by wind or water. The challenges of managing agricultural plastics and the importance of effective management of these products is recognised in the Plastic Pollution reduction plan.

Some agricultural wastes, such as manure, harvest wastes, fertilizer, salt, and silt run-off, are not covered by the LIDMF.

Waste in the rural and agricultural sector moves through the environment via four pathways:


Last updated: 29 January 2021

This page should be cited as:

Department of Environment and Science, Queensland (2021) Rural and agricultural areas, WetlandInfo website, accessed 1 February 2021. Available at: https://wetlandinfo.des.qld.gov.au/wetlands/management/pressures/litter-illegal-dumping/sources/agriculture/

Queensland Government
WetlandInfo   —   Department of Environment and Science