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Wetland weeds

The invasion of wetlands by exotic species is a major threat to wetland values. Many plants are declared weeds in Queensland and/or Weeds of National Significance. Many of the weeds declared under the Land Protection (Pest and Stock Route Management) Act 2002 in Queensland are also wetland plants.

Many wetland weeds have been deliberately introduced for agriculture or domestic gardens and aquariums, but have escaped, invading waterways and other wetlands. Heavy infestations by weeds can affect wetlands by disrupting natural flood regime interfering with irrigation infrastructure and destroying wildlife habitats, fishing grounds and visual amenities.

Hymenachne amplexicaulis, Photo by Chris Sanderson

Quick facts

Hymenachne
grass was introduced to Australia from South America and has become an unwanted weed in stream banks, high conservation value natural wetlands, irrigation ditches, low lying sugarcane and fish habitats in Queensland.
Hymenachne can increase flooding by reducing the flow capacity of the drainage networks.

The Queensland Department of Agriculture, Fisheries and Forestry provides information on a range of weeds in Queensland, including plants declared under the Land Protection Act 2002 and fact sheets on selected weeds species.

Other general information on weeds and their management is available from sources such as the Commonwealth Government's list of Weeds of National Significance.

Additional information


Last updated: 22 March 2013

This page should be cited as:

Wetland weeds, WetlandInfo, Department of Environment and Science, Queensland, viewed 11 February 2019, <https://wetlandinfo.des.qld.gov.au/wetlands/ecology/components/flora/wetland-weeds.html>.

Queensland Government
WetlandInfo   —   Department of Environment and Science